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Evening Lectures - Pensacola

Tony Ryan

THE TALK: The Solar Revolution: Providing the food and energy for 10 billion people depends on harnessing sunshine

February 26, 2015

Abstract

The University of Sheffield has developed Project Sunshine in order to harness the power of the sun to tackle the biggest global challenge: meeting the increasing food and energy needs of the world’s population in the context of an uncertain climate and global environment change. It unites world-leading researchers from across the faculties of Science, Engineering and Social Science at the University of Sheffield. Together, they are developing new ways to use the Sun’s energy more efficiently to increase food production and provide more renewable energy

Biography

Tony Ryan is the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for the Faculty of Science at the University of Sheffield where he was previously the ICI Professor of Physical Chemistry, Head of the Chemistry Department and Director of the Polymer Centre. His research covers the synthesis, structure, processing and properties of polymers and their use in a wide range of applications including energy capture, wound healing, drug delivery as well as paint, soft-furnishings and packaging. He has co-authored more than 300 papers and has an H-index of 58. His 1998 text book, with Arthur Wilkinson, on polymer processing is used world-wide and in 2014 he published a book on sustainability, “The Solar Revolution”, co-authored with Steve McKevitt, a social scientist, and it has had great reviews; it puts into context how we come to live on a planet supporting 7 billion people and what we have to do make sure in remains inhabitable (and prosperous) for the foreseeable future.

Tony presented the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures on Channel 4 in 2002 and is a regular contributor to TV, radio and newspapers. He was born in Leeds and has three degrees from UMIST. Married with two daughters, Tony is a creative cook, a keen cyclist and an occasional mountaineer and skier. He was made an OBE in 2006 for ‘Services to Science’.

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